This Week in Gaming – 28th February 20218 minute read

From mistranslated mutants, Sub-Zero playing basketball and the failed Altered Beast remake by Sega, This Week in Gaming brings you more of the anniversaries reached over the last seven days as well as some fun facts as well.

22nd February

Double Dragon III: The Sacred Stones (image credit: Technōs Japan)

Double Dragon III: The Sacred Stones was released in Japan under the title Double Dragon III: The Rosetta Stone (ダブルドラゴンIII ザ・ロゼッタストーン). It was the first video game that I ever noticed a mistake in when I was young. The mistake was on the opening screen of the two-player mode. On this screen Billy’s name is spelt “Bimmy” and was attributed to a translation error. However the spelling mistake did lead to the inspiration behind the enemies in Double Dragon Neon named Bimmy ‘n’ Jammy. They are deformed clones of the Lee Brothers and described as “Mistranslated Mutants.”

  • 30 Years
    • Double Dragon III: The Sacred Stones
  • 19 Years
    • JSRF: Jet Set Radio Future – Xbox (Japan)
  • 16 Years
    • Gran Turismo 4 – PlayStation 2
    • Kessen III – PlayStation 2
    • MVP Baseball 2005 – PlayStation 2
    • Ys: The Ark of Napishtim – PlayStation 2
  • 15 Years
    • TOCA Race Driver 3 – PlayStation 2
  • 14 Years
    • Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn – Wii (Japan)
    • Monster Hunter Freedon 2 – PSP (Japan)
  • 11 Years
    • Endless Ocean: Blue World – Wii
    • Risen – Xbox 360
  • 10 Years
    • Bulletstorm – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
    • Fallout: New Vegas – Dead Money – PC, PlayStation 3
    • Killzone 3 – PlayStation 3
    • Radiant Historia – Nintendo DS

23rd February

NBA Jam: Tournament Edition (image credit: Midway)

NBA Jam was originally released in 1993 and was the first instalment in the NBA Jam series of games. The initial release gave birth to a new genre of fast-paced arcade-style sports games with exagerated realism. The Tournament Edition was released in arcades initially and included new rosters, features, easter eggs and utilised the same gameplay as the original. The original test version had six playable characters which was taken out by request of the NBA. these were Elvicious, Grim Reaper, Kong, Raiden, Reptile and Sub-Zero. The game was later ported to several consoles, of which the Super Nintendo was one.

  • 26 Years
    • NBA Jam: Tournament Edition – Super Nintendo
  • 22 Years
    • Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter – PlayStation
  • 15 Years
    • Baten Kaitos Origins – GameCube (Japan)
    • Disgaea 2: Cursed Memories – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Initial D: Street Stage – PSP (Japan)
    • Suikoden V – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Warship Gunner 2 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Yu-Gi-Oh! Ultimate Masters: World Championship tournament 2006 – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
  • 12 Years
    • Drakensang: The Dark Eye – PC
  • 11 Years
    • Borderlands: The Secret Armory of General Knoxx – Xbox 360
    • Heavy Rain – PlayStation 3
    • Napolean: total War – PC
    • Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s World Championship 2010: Reverse of Arcadia – Nintendo DS

24th February

Lufia II: Rise of the Sinistrals (image credit: Neverland)

Lufia II: Rise of the Sinistrals is known as Estpolis Denki II (エストポリス伝記II, officially translated Biography of Estpolis II) in Japan and simply Lufia in Europe and Australia. It is a prequel to Lufia & the Fortress of Doom and follows the story of the main characters ancestor Maxim. Within the game the origins of the wat between mankind and the Sinistrals are explained. The game was well received and in 2010 Square Enix released their re-imagining of the game titled Lufia: Curse of the Sinistrals.

  • 26 Years
    • Front Mission – Super Nintendo (Japan)
    • Lufia II: Rise of the Sinistrals – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 21 Years
    • Fear Effect – PlayStation
  • 19 Years
    • Digimon Rumble Arena – PlayStation
  • 17 Years
    • Romance of the Three Kingdoms IX – PlayStation 2
  • 16 Years
    • Dynasty Warriors 5 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Mega Man Battle Network 5: Team Colonel – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
    • Need for Speed Underground Rivals – PSP (Japan)
    • Tekken 5 – PlayStation 2
  • 15 Years
    • Samurai Warriors 2 – PlayStation 2 (Japan
  • 12 Years
    • Legacy of Ys: Books I & II – Nintendo DS
    • Star Ocean: The Last Hope – Xbox 360
  • 10 Years
    • Disgaea 4: A Promise Unforgotten – PlayStation 3 (Japan)
    • Phantasy Star Portable 2 Infinity – PSP (Japan)
    • Rune Factory: Tides of Destiny – PlayStation 3, Wii (Japan)
    • SD Gundam G Generation World – PSP (Japan)
    • Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s World Championship 2011: Over the Nexus – Nintendo DS (Japan)

25th February

Project Altered Beast (image credit: Sega)

Altered Beast was released under the title Jūōki: Project Altered Beast (獣王記 Project Altered Beast) in Japan. It is a remake of the original 1988 arcae game Altered Beast but is more of a re-imagining than a remaster or remake. The main character kept the same abilities as the original arcade game but the story, other characters and setting are all completely different. One huge difference is the fact that it is no longer set in Ancient Greece but in a modern environment. Whilst the game was released in Japan and Europe it was cancelled for it’s North America release. The game suffered poor reviews with an average score of 5/10.

  • 27 Years
    • New Horizons – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 22 Years
    • Monster Ranchers 2 – PlayStation (Japan)
  • 19 Years
    • JSRF: Jet Set Radio Future – Xbox
  • 16 Years
    • Project Altered Beast – PlayStation 2
  • 11 Years
    • Final Fantasy – iOS
    • final Fantasy II – iOS
    • Katekyoo Hitman Reborn! Kizuna no Tag Battle – PSP (Japan)
    • Super Robot Taisen OG Saga: Mugen no Frontier EXCEED – Nintendo DS (Japan)
    • Virtual Villagers 4: The Tree of Life – PC

26th February

Tenchu: Stealth Assassins (image credit: Acquire)

Tenchu: Stealth Assassins was one of the first ninja games to use stealth – a key to the art of ninjutsu. The game was developed by Acquire and released by Sony Music Entertainment in Japan and released by Activision in North America and Europe. The game incpororates historical fantasy and also Japanese mythology as it takes place in fuedal Japan. Sho Kosugi, a famous actor and martial artist, and his son were hired as motion capture actors for the games combat moves.

  • 28 Years
    • Batman Returns – Super nintendo (Japan)
  • 23 Years
    • Tenchu: Stealth Assassins – PlayStation (Japan)
    • X-Men vs. Street Fighter – PlayStation (Japan)
  • 18 Years
    • Zenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zue Macht – PlayStation 2
  • 17 Years
    • Onimusha 3: Demon Siege – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 14 Years
    • Jade Empire: Special Edition – PC
  • 13 Years
    • Patapon – PSP
    • The Sims 2: FreeTime – PC
  • 12 Years
    • Dynasty Warriors: Strikeforce – PSP (Japan)
    • Halo Wars – Xbox 360 (Japan)
    • The King of Fighters 2002 Unlimied Match – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Way of the Samurai 3 – Xbox 360 (Japan)
    • Yakuza 3 – PlayStation 3 (Japan)
  • 10 Years
    • Nintendo 3DS (Japan)
    • Nintendogs + Cats: golden Retriever & New Friends – 3DS (Japan)
    • Professor Layton and the Miracle Mask – 3DS (Japan)
    • StreetPass Mii Plaza – 3DS (Japan)
    • Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition – 3DS (Japan)

27th February

The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages/Oracle of Seasons (image credit: Capcom, Flagship)

That’s right – The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons and The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages were not Nintendo developed games. They were developed by flagship which is a subsidary of Capcom. Originally released in 2001 they made us of the interactive functionalities of the Game Boy Color. The games were inherently different with Oracle of Ages focussing more on puzzles while Oracle of Seasons focussed on the action elements of the game. Various elements of the game meant that the Game Link Cable could be used to add extra functionality to both titles wither during the game or on completion.

  • 31 Years
    • Castle of Dragon – NES (Japan)
  • 25 Years
    • Pokemon Green – Game Boy (Japan)
    • Pokemon Red – Game Boy (Japan)
  • 20 Years
    • The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages – Game Boy Color (Japan)
    • The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons – Game Boy Color (Japan)
  • 19 Years
    • Command & Conquer: Renegade – PC
  • 18 Years
    • Dynasty Warriors 4 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • MotoGP 3 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Star Ocean 3: Till the End of Time – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 15 Years
    • Super Princess Peach – Nintendo DS
  • 14 Years
    • Formula One Championship Edition – PlayStation 3
    • Samurai Warriors 2: Empires – PlayStation 2
    • The Sims 2 Seasons – PC
  • 12 Years
    • Killzone 2 – PlayStation 3

28th February

Contra III: The Alien Wars (image credit: Konami)

Konami both developed and published Contra III for a 1992 release on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. It is the third instalment in the Contra series of games after both Contra in 1987 and Super C in 1988. The player has to fight off an alien invasion across six stages in true side-scrolling fashion. The game received incredibly favorable reviews with a lot of praise on the sprites, visuals and soud design.

  • 29 Years
    • Contra III: The Alien Wars – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 26 Years
    • Star Wars: Dark Forces – PC
  • 24 Years
    • Super Bomberman 5 – Super Nintendo (Japan)
    • Turok: Dinosaur Hunter – Nintendo 64
  • 22 Years
    • Heroes of Might and Magic III – PC
    • Resident Evil 2 (1998) – PC
  • 19 Years
    • Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 18 Years
    • The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time / Master Quest – GameCube
  • 16 Years
    • Star Wars: Republic Commando – Xbox
    • The Sims 2 University – PC
  • 15 Years
    • Black – PlayStation 2
    • The Sims 2: Open for Business – PC
  • 10 Years
    • Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II – Retribution – PC