This Week in Gaming – 25th July 20218 minute read

Ninja’s, wrestlers, mutant turtles and violent motorcyclists…This Week in Gaming has them all! Read more about the milestone anniversaries that we have seen across this beautiful gaming industry below.

19th July

Star Ocean (image credit: tri-Ace)

Star Ocean was developed by tri-Ace and published by Enix for the Super Nintendo. The game is the first in the Star Ocean franchise of games and was only released in Japan until July 1996. The development team comprised of individuals that had left Team Wolf as they were unhappy with the development process for Tales of Phantasia. A rarity about this game is the fact that it has voice actors, which is not common with games on the cartridges for the Super Nintendo system.

  • 30 Years
    • Disney’s The Little Mermaid – NES (Japan)
    • Final Fantasy IV – Super Nintendo (Japan)
    • The Legend of the Mystical Ninja – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 25 Years
    • Star Ocean – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 21 Years
    • Siege of Avalon – PC
  • 20 Years
    • Final Fantasy X – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Mega Man Xtreme 2 – Game Boy Color (Japan)
  • 19 Years
    • Fire Pro Wrestling 2 – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
    • Super Mario Sunshine – GameCube (Japan)
  • 17 Years
    • Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike – Fight for the Future – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 15 Years
    • Cute Knight – PC
  • 14 Years
    • Naruto Shippuden: Ninja Council 4 – Nintendo DS (Japan)
  • 11 Years
    • Alien Swarm – PC
  • 10 Years
    • Fallout: New Vegas – Old World Blues

20th July

Wrestle Kingdom (image credit: Yuke’s)

Wrestle Kingdom (レッスルキングダム, Ressuru Kingudamu) is a wrestling game that was released only in Japan. It is an officially licensed game and both reached the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 2 platforms. The game features a roster containing New Japan Pro-Wrestling, All Japan Pro Wrestling, Pro Wrestling Noah and some freelancers. The Xbox 360 version of the game was recalled due to it not saving to the players hard drives.

  • 35 Years
    • Black Belt – Sega Master System (Japan)
  • 33 Years
    • Bionic Commando – NES (Japan)
  • 31 Years
    • Captain Tsubasa II: Super Striker – NES (Japan)
  • 28 Years
    • God Medicine: Fantasy Sekai no Tanjou – Game Boy (Japan)
  • 17 Years
    • Catwoman – Game Boy Advance, PlayStation 2
    • ESPN NFL 2K5 – PlayStation 2, Xbox
    • Nancy Drew: The Secret of Shadow Ranch – PC
    • Puyo Pop Fever – GameCube
    • Sudeki – Xbox
  • 16 Years
    • Colosseum: Road to Freedom – PlayStation 2
  • 15 Years
    • Battle Stadium D.O.N – GameCube, PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Bomberman – PSP (Japan)
    • Ultraman Fighting Evolution 0 – PSP (Japan)
    • Wrestle Kingdom – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 10 Years
    • Bastion – Xbox 360
    • Pocket League Story – Android (Japan)

21st July

Castlevania: Dracula X (image credit: Konami)

Castlevania: Rondo of Blood is platform adventure game that was developed by Konami for the PC Engine CD system. The game launched originally in 1993 before being ported over to the Super Nintendo in 1995 as Castlevania: Dracula X. The game featured a different art style to the original as well as redesigned levels and altered gameplay elements.

  • 27 Years
    • Shining Force CD – Sega CD
  • 26 Years
    • Castlevania: Dracula X – Super Nintendo (Japan)
    • King’s Field – PlayStation (Japan)
  • 25 Years
    • Mole Mania – Game Boy (Japan)
  • 21 Years
    • Mario Tennis – Nintendo 64 (Japan)
  • 20 Years
    • Mario Kart: Super Circuit – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
  • 19 Years
    • Adventure Quest – Online
  • 16 Years
    • Devil Kings – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Mario Superstar Baseball – GameCube (Japan)
    • Mega Man Battle Network 5: Double Team – Nintendo DS (Japan)
    • Yu-Gi-Oh! Nightmare Troubadour – Nintendo DS (Japan)
  • 13 Years
    • Final Fantasy IV – Nintendo DS
  • 12 Years
    • Little King’s Story – Nintendo Wii
  • 11 Years
    • LIMBO – Xbox 360
  • 10 Years
    • Rhythm Heaven Fever – Nintendo Wii (Japan)
    • Sengoku Basara: Chronicle Heroes – PSP (Japan)

22nd July

Road Rash II (image credit: Electronic Arts)

Road Rash II was launched in 1992 on the Genesis and followed on from the success of the original game in the series. The game follows the same concept of racing throughout America with armed and unarmed racers battling to hinder the opponents as much as possible. The game introduced split-screen gaming to the franchise, as well as chains, nitrous oxide and varying offensive weapons.

  • 31 Years
    • Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake – MSX (Japan)
  • 28 Years
    • Road Rash II – Mega Drive/Genesis
  • 27 Years
    • Mega Man V – Game Boy (Japan)
    • Pieces – Super Nintendo (Japan)
    • Pulseman – Mega Drive/Genesis (Japan)
    • Super Bonk – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 23 Years
    • The King of Fighters ’98: The Slugfest – Arcade
  • 22 Years
    • Neon Genesis Evangelion: Shito Ikusei – WondeSwan (Japan)
    • The King of Fighters ’99: Millennium Battle – Arcade (Japan)
    • The Misadventures of Tron Bonne – PlayStation (Japan)
  • 17 Years
    • Boktai 2: Solar Boy Django – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
    • Gradius V – PlaySyayion 2 (Japan)
    • Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door – GameCube (Japan)
    • RPG Maker XP – PC (Japan)
    • Tenchu: Fatal Shadows – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 13 Years
    • Izuna 2: The Unemployed Ninja Returns – Nintendo DS
    • Order Up! – Nintendo Wii
  • 11 Years
    • Fate/Extra – PSP (Japan)

23rd July

Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master (image credit: Sega)

Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master was released in 1993 on the Genesis console. The game is a direct sequel to The Revenge of Shinobi which was released in 1989. The game focuses more on speed rather than difficulty, making an easier gameplay for the player. In Japan it was released as The Super Shinobi II (ザ・スーパー忍II, Za Sūpā Shinobu II).

  • 28 Years
    • Dai-3-Ji Super Robot Taisen – Super Nintendo (Japan)
    • Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master – Mega Drive/Genesis (Japan)
  • 23 Years
    • Yu-Gi-Oh! Monster Capsule Breed & Battle – PlayStation (Japan)
  • 20 Years
    • Desperados: Wanted Dead or Alive – PC
    • Extermination – PlayStation 2
    • Max Payne – PC
  • 18 Years
    • Downhill Domination – PlayStation 2
  • 17 Years
    • Guilty Gear X2 #Reload – PC (Japan)
  • 14 Years
    • Sid Meier’s Civilization IV: Beyond the Sword – PC
  • 13 Years
    • Puzzle Quest: Challenge of the Warloards – Revenge of the Plague Lord – Xbox 360
  • 12 Years
    • Blazing Souls: Accelate – PSP (Japan)
    • Dragon Ball: Revenge of King Piccolo – Nintendo Wii (Japan)
    • Katamari Forever – PlayStation 3 (Japan)
    • Okaeri! Chibi-Robo! Happy Richie Oosouji – Nintendo DS (Japan)

24th July

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time (image credit: Konami)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time is a sequel to the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arcade game. It was developed and published by Konami and released in March 1991 in arcades worldwide. The Super Nintendo saw its port in July 1992 in Japan, whilst North America and Europe had to wait until August and November of the same year respectively. The game was popular and was ranked 7th in the “Top 10 in 1992” for Nintendo Power magazine.

  • 29 Years
    • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 24 Years
    • Monster Rancher – PlayStation (Japan)
  • 21 Years
    • Warlocked – Game Boy Color
  • 18 Years
    • Shining Soul II – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
    • Tokyo Xtreme Racer 3 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 14 Years
    • Final Fantasy II – PSP
  • 13 Years
    • Boku no Mehisho wa Doukyuusei – PC
    • Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus – PSP (Japan)
    • SIREN: Blood Curse – PlayStation 3

25th July

Tecmo’s Deception: Invitation to Darkness (image credit: Tecmo)

Firstly, let us visit the complicated naming convention of Tecmo’s Deception: Invitation to Darkness. The game is often referred to as simply Deception, and the official title of the game is Tecmo’s Deception. However it was released as Kokumeikan (刻命館) in Japan, and as Devil’s Deception in Europe. The game is a twist on the normal RPG model and places the player in the role of an evil lord. As said lord you must use traps and monsters to kill heroes that dare venture into your castle…pretty neat right? Electronic Gaming Monthly stated that it was “perhaps the most innovative console RPG ever released”.

  • 25 Years
    • Tecmo’s Deception: Invitation to Darkness – PlayStation
  • 24 Years
    • Resident Evil – Saturn (Japan)
  • 20 Years
    • Klonoa 2: Lunetea’s Veil – PlayStation 2
  • 19 Years
    • Gekitou! Crush Gear Turbo – PlayStation (Japan)
    • JoJo no Kimyou na Bouken: Ougon no Kaze – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 18 Years
    • Age of Wonders: Shadow Magic – PC
    • F-Zero GX – GameCube (Japan)
    • Onimusha Tactics – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
  • 17 Years
    • Bujingai: The Forsaken City – PlayStation 2
  • 15 Years
    • Tekken: Dark Resurrection – PSP

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