This Week in Gaming – 18th July 20218 minute read

This Week in Gaming has film adaptation games, Japanese football and a history of one of the greatest swordsman in Japanese history. Read more below to see all the highlights from This Week in Gaming.

12th July

Virtua Tennis (image credit: Sega)

Virtua Tennis was released originally in 1999 in arcades before Dreamcast would receive its port in 2000. Domestically in Japan the game was called Power Smash and always has been. This is until the rights were sold to 2K and the triquel changed the name in all regions to Virtua Tennis 3. The original arcade game featured various tournaments and arcade modes, with the home console ports introducing the campaign mode.

  • 30 Years
    • Castlevania II: Belmont’s Revenge – Game Boy (Japan)
    • Super Baseball Simulator 1.000 – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 21 Years
    • Virtua Tennis – Dreamcast
  • 20 Years
    • Heavy Metal: Geomatrix – Dreamcast (Japan)
    • Pac-Man Collection – Game Boy Advance
  • 17 Years
    • Pokemon Box: Ruby and Sapphire – GameCube
  • 15 Years
    • Virtual Villagers: A New Home – PC
  • 14 Years
    • Death Note: L o Tsugu Mono – Nintendo DS (Japan)
    • Dragon Quest Swords: The Masked Queen and the Tower of Mirrors – Nintendo Wii (Japan)
    • Mega Man ZX Advent – Nintendo DS (Japan)
    • Sword of the New World: Granado Espada – PC
  • 11 Years
    • Game Dev Story – iOS (Japan)
  • 10 Years
    • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2 – Xbox 360
    • NCAA Football 12 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360

13th July

Metal Gear (image credit: Konami)

Metal Gear was originally released by Konamifor the MSX2 console in 1987. It was the first video game that was developed by Hideo Kojima who went on to create the critically acclaimed Metal Gear series of games. The game was reworked after the intitial launched and ported to the Famicon a few months later. Soon the NES received a port of it’s own, which was a dramatic rework of the original. A more faithful port was featured in Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence for the PlayStation 2.

  • 34 Years
    • Metal Gear – MSX2 (Japan)
  • 30 Years
    • Super R-Type – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 21 Years
    • Blaster Master: Blasting Again – PlayStation (Japan)
    • Yu-Gi-Oh! Dark Duel Stories – Game Boy Color (Japan)
  • 20 Years
    • Super Street Figher II Turbo: Revival – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
  • 17 Years
    • Tales of Symphonia – GameCube
  • 15 Years
    • MetropolisMania 2 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Naruto: Path of th eNinja 2 – Nintendo DS (Japan)
    • Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 3 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 12 Years
    • Pulseman – Mega Drive/Genesis
  • 11 Years
    • DarkStar One: Broken Alliance – Xbox 360
    • DeathSpank – PlayStation 3
    • Disciples III: Renaissance – PC
    • NCAA Football 11 – PlayStation 3, Xbxo 360
  • 10 Years
    • Arma: Cold War Assault – PC
    • Dungeons of Dredmor – PC

14th July

Super Mario All-Stars (image credit: Nintendo)

Super Mario All-Stars was a compilation title that was released for the Super Nintendo in 1993. The game contains remakes for the original NES titles from the Super Mario franchise including Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, Super Mario Bros. 2 and of course Super Mario Bros. 3. The changes were in regards to the graphics and the music. Previously Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels was not commercially available outside of Japan as Super Mario Bros. 2 had been launched in western regions.

  • 29 Years
    • Mario Paint – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 28 Years
    • Super Mario All-Stars – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 26 Years
    • Mystic Ark – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 23 Years
    • F-Zero X – Nintendo 64 (Japan)
    • WWF War Zone – PlayStation
  • 22 Years
    • Ogre Battle 64: Person of Lordly Caliber – Nintendo 64 (Japan)
  • 21 Years
    • Bible Black – PC (Japan)
    • Threads of Fate – PlayStation
  • 12 Years
    • NCAA Football 10 – Xbox 360
  • 11 Years
    • DeathSpank – Xbox 360
    • The King of Fighters XIII – Arcade (Japan)
  • 10 Years
    • Star Fox 64 3D – 3DS (Japan)
    • Unchained Blades – PSP (Japan)

15th July

Sega SG-1000

The SG-1000 is a console that was released by Sega on the same day as the NES. This was the first entry from Sega into the home console market, ahead of the Master System which became more popular. There were several versions of the SG model including the SG-1000, SG-3000 and the SG-1000 II which saw a release in 1984. Further to this redesign of the SG-1000 there was a 1985 release of the Sega Mark III which was a further upgrade to the original specifications. The games were on two formats – the ROM cartridge and Sega My Card formats. Both of these were compatible with the Mark III and the Japanese version of the Sega Master System.

  • 38 Years
    • Donkey Kong – NES (Japan)
    • Donkey Kong Jr. – NES (Japan)
    • Nintendo Entertainment System (Japan)
    • Popeye – NES (Japan)
    • SG-1000 (Japan)
  • 33 Years
    • Galaga ’90 – TurboGrafx-16 (Japan)
  • 27 Years
    • Keeper – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 22 Years
    • Frame Gride – Dreamcast (Japan)
    • Legend of Mana – PlayStation (Japan)
  • 17 Years
    • Hamtaro: Ham-Ham Games – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
    • NCAA Football 2005 – GameCube, PlayStation 2
    • Phantasy Star Online: Blue Burst – PC (Japan)
    • Shin Megami Tensei: Digital Devil Saga – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 13 Years
    • NCAA Football 09 – PlayStation 2, Xbox 360
    • Rock Band: Track Pack – Volume 1 – Nintendo Wii
  • 12 Years
    • The Secret of Monkey Island: Special Edition – PC, Xbox 360
  • 11 Years
    • Dragon Quest Monsters: Battle Road Victory – Nintendo Wii (Japan)
    • Fire Emblem: Shin Monshou no Nazo – Hikari to Kage no Eiyuu – Nintendo DS (Japan)
    • Last Ranker – PSP (Japan)
    • Naruto Shippuden: Kizuna Drive – PSP (Japan)

16th July

Brave Fencer Musashi (image credit: Square)

Brave Fencer Musashi (ブレイヴフェンサー 武蔵伝, Bureivu Fensā Musashiden, “Brave Fencer: The Legend of Musashi”) was released for the PlayStation in 1998 in Japan and North America. The game is an action role-playing game which contains real-time sword combat and certain role-playing elements such as a day and night circle. It was developed by Square and originally conceptualised in 1997 by Hironobu Sakaguchi. The character Kojiro was based on the Japanese swordsman Kojiro Sakasi (佐々木 小次郎) who lived between 1575 and 1612. Sakasi was considered a master of his craft and died battling Miyamoto Musashi in which he favored a straight edged nodachi with a blade length of 90cm.

  • 29 Years
    • Ayrton Senna’s Super Monaco GP II – Mega Drive/Genesis
  • 28 Years
    • Mouryou Senki Madara 2 – Super Nintendo (Japan)
  • 23 Years
    • Brave Fencer Musashi – PlayStation (Japan)
    • Hanabi Fantast – PlayStation (Japan)
    • Tomba! – PlayStation
  • 22 Years
    • Legend of the River King 2 – Game Boy Color (Japan)
  • 20 Years
    • Dragon Warrior III – Game Boy Color
  • 14 Years
    • All-Pro Football 2K8 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
  • 12 Years
    • What Did I Do to Deserve This, My Lord!? – PSP
    • Ys I & II Chronicles – PSP (Japan)
  • 10 Years
    • Inazuma Eleven Strikers – Nintendo Wii (Japan)

17th July

Captain Tsubasa III: Koutei no Chousen (image credit: Tecmo)

Captain Tsubasa III: Koutei no Chousen (キャプテン翼III —皇帝の挑戦—) was released on the Super Famicon in 1992 in Japan. The game was a graphical update of the previous Captain Tsubasa games and also featured a map of the pitch at the bottom of the screen – something more familiar with modern football releases. The game was never released outside of Japan.

  • 34 Years
    • Legacy of the Wizard – NES (Japan)
  • 29 Years
    • Captain Tsubasa III: Koutei no Chousen – Super Nintendo (Japan)
    • Gargoyle’s Quest II – NES (Japan)
  • 24 Years
    • Clock Tower: The First Fear – PlayStation (Japan)
    • Street Fighter EX Plus Alpha – PlayStation (Japan)
  • 19 Years
    • Gundam: Battle Assault 2 – PlayStation
  • 18 Years
    • Boktai: The Sun Is in your Hand – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
    • Mega Man X7 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Silent Line: Armored Core – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic – Xbox
  • 14 Years
    • Tales of the World: Radiant Mythology – PSP
  • 13 Years
    • Dragon Quest V: Hand of the HEavenly Bride – Nintendo DS (Japan)
    • Gundam Battle Universe – PSP (Japan)
    • Metal Slug 7 – Nintendo DS (Japan)

18th July

Willow (image credit: Capcom)

Willow had it’s own video game release back in 1989 on the Nintendo Entertainment System after Capcom both developed and published the title. The game is based on the film of the same name and is actually the second game that Capcom released based on the film in the same year. The other version was a side-scrolling platform game whereas this version for the NES is an action role-playing game.

  • 32 Years
    • Willow – NES (Japan)
  • 21 Years
    • Army Men: Air Combat – Nintendo 64
  • 19 Years
    • Ape Escape 2 – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
    • Gungrave – PlayStation 2 (Japan)
  • 18 Years
    • Dragon Drive: World D Break – Game Boy Advance (Japan)
    • Pokemon Channel – GameCube (Japan)
    • Street Legal Racing: Redline – PC
  • 15 Years
    • Blade Dancer: Lineage of Light – PSP
    • Miami Vice: The Game – PSP
    • Monster House – Game Boy Advance, GameCube, PlayStation 2
    • NCAA Football 07 – PlayStation 2
    • Super Dragon Ball Z – PlayStation 2
    • Valkyrie Profile: Lenneth – PSP
  • 14 Years
    • Wangan Midnight Maximum Tune 3 – Arcade (Japan)
  • 13 Years
    • Street Fighter IV – Arcade (Japan)

Please follow @fingrsandthuums on Twitter or Fing’rs & Thu’ums at Facebook to receive notification of when we publish more news, reviews and more.

Leave a Reply